Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Warning:

This online archive of the CDC Prevention Guidelines Database is being maintained for historical purposes, and has had no new entries since October 1998. To find more recent guidelines, please visit the following:


Limited Supplies of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine -- United States

MMWR 43(32);595-596

Publication date: 08/19/1994


Table of Contents

Article

References

POINT OF CONTACT FOR THIS DOCUMENT:


Article

There is a shortage of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the manufacturers (Pasteur Merieux Serums & Vaccines, S.A. {Lyon, France} {IPOLTM} *, and Connaught Laboratories, Limited {Willowdale, Ontario, Canada} {POLIOVAXTM}), and the distributor, Connaught Laboratories, Inc. (Swiftwater, Pennsylvania), are working to resolve the shortage.

Until IPV becomes readily available, CDC recommends that its use be restricted to:

  1. never-vaccinated persons aged greater than 18 years who are at risk for exposure to wild poliovirus (e.g., who will be traveling to areas in which poliomyelitis is endemic), and
  2. persons for whom oral polio vaccine (OPV) is contraindicated (i.e., persons diagnosed with or living in a household with a person with a congenital or acquired immune deficiency).
Inadequately or fully vaccinated adults who have previously received IPV or OPV and need poliovirus vaccine can be given OPV (1,2). OPV continues to be recommended routinely for all children, except as noted above.

If supplies are not available locally, poliovirus vaccination of persons for whom OPV is contraindicated should be delayed until IPV becomes available. Because no case of polio resulting from indigenously transmitted wild poliovirus has been reported in the United States since 1979, postponing vaccination for these persons until IPV is available is not likely to pose a risk to those persons. Unvaccinated adults who may be exposed to wild poliovirus during travel to polio-endemic areas and cannot obtain IPV should consider vaccination with OPV but should be informed that the risk for vaccine-associated paralytic polio is slightly higher in adults than in children (1,2). Otherwise, these persons should avoid activities or travel that might result in exposure to wild poliovirus.

Information about obtaining IPV for high-risk persons is available from the distributor, Connaught Laboratories, Inc., telephone (800) 822-2463. MMWR will provide updated information when the shortage is alleviated.

Reported by: Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration. National Immunization Program, CDC.


References

  1. ACIP. Poliomyelitis prevention. MMWR 1982;31:22-6,31-4.
  2. ACIP. Poliomyelitis prevention: enhanced-potency inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine -- supplementary statement. MMWR 1987;36:795-8.

* Use of trade names and commercial sources is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the Public Health Service or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.


POINT OF CONTACT FOR THIS DOCUMENT:

To request a copy of this document or for questions concerning this document, please contact the person or office listed below. If requesting a document, please specify the complete name of the document as well as the address to which you would like it mailed. Note that if a name is listed with the address below, you may wish to contact this person via CDC WONDER/PC e-mail.
For single issue purchase 800-843-6356
NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM
State/Fed Gov: For free copies
write to: CDC, MMWR MS(C-08)
Atlanta, GA 30333



This page last reviewed: Wednesday, January 27, 2016
This information is provided as technical reference material. Please contact us at cwus@cdc.gov to request a simple text version of this document.
TOP