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Sexually Transmitted Disease Morbidity
United States, Guam, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands,
Archive Data: 1984-2013; 1984-2011; 1984-2009; 1984-2008, 1984-2007, 1984-2006, 1984-2003.

Summary:    This documentation describes previously published archive data. Refer to STD Morbidity Data to access current data. Current data includes recent years and supersedes data published for previous years.

Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) morbidity case reports reported to the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The number of cases and disease incidence rates are reported by year, gender of patient, type of STD, and area of report.

Population:    Disease reports are from the 50 United States and D.C., Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands and Guam. See Data Source Information for more about the denominator population data sources.
Source:    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance. The latest CDC STD published surveillance reports are available at STD Surveillance and Statistics.
In WONDER:    You can produce tables, maps, charts, and data extracts. Obtain incidence counts and rates, and select specific disease and demographic criteria to produce cross-tabulated incidence measures. You can limit and index your data by any and all of the variables

Please refer to the following topics:


Archive STD Morbidity Data Request

Output:    You can produce tables, maps, charts, and data extracts.

Variables:    You can limit and index your data by any and all of these variables:

  1. Disease
  2. Gender
  3. Regional multi-state groups:
    STD reporting regions
    MMWR reporting regions
    HHS regions
  4. State and outlying areas
  5. Year
How?    The Request screen has sections to guide you through the making a data request as step-by-step process. However, to get your first taste of how the system works, you might want to simply press any Send button, and execute the default data request. The data results for your query appear on the Table screen. After you get your data results, try the Chart and Map screens. Or export your data to a file (tab-delimited line listing) for download to your computer.

For more information, see the following:

Quick Start Guide
Step 1, Organize and label results
Step 2, Select location
Step 3, Select disease, year and gender
Step 4, Other options

'By-Variables'    Select variables that serve as keys (indexes) for organizing your data. See How do I organize my data? for more information.
Note:    To map your data, you must select at least one geographical location as a "By-Variable" for grouping your data, such as State.
Help:    Click on any button labeled "Help", located to the right hand side of the screen at the top of each section. Or click on any label, such as the "Group Results By" label.
Send:    Sends your data request to be processed on the CDC WONDER databases. The Send buttons are located on the bottom of the Request page, and also in the upper right corner of each section, for easy access.



Step 1. Organize table layout:

Group Results By   Select up to five variables that serve as keys for grouping your data. See Group Results By below for hints.
Title   Enter any desired description to display as a title with your results.

The following statistical measures are available as query results:

  1. Counts
  2. Rates


Group Results By...

Select up to five variables that serve as keys for grouping your data. For example, you could select to group (summarize, stratify, index) your data by State and by Year, to compare each the disease reports by state for each year.

How?   

Hints:   

  1. About charts:
    You cannot make charts when your data has more than two By-Variables.
  2. About maps:
    To make a map, you must request data grouped by a geographic location variable, such as State, as the first By-Variable. Then click the Map tab after you obtain the data results.
  3. About regions:
    You can only select one type of regional area division for a data request. For example, if you select to group the data by HHS regions, then you cannot also group the data by MMWR regions in the same request. However, you can also group the data by State.
  4. When data is grouped by Region (when Region is selected as a By-Variable) then the data includes US and outlying areas.
  5. About diseases:
    Because the denominator populations used for calculating rates vary among the different diseases, you must select Disease as one of the indexes when your request is limited to more two or more specific diseases. If you are selecting more than one disease, then select Disease as a By-Variable.

Counts

Counts show the sum or the frequency incidence of STD disease case reports, for the selected categories in the data request.


Rates

The rates are calculated as the incidence of STD disease reports, divided by the population, and then the result is result is multiplied by 100,000 (the default factor) to indicate the rate per so many persons. You can select the factor for rates in the Other options section on the data request screen.

Notes:  

  • The phrase Not Reported is shown when the specific disease was not reported for the given location and year.
  • The phrase Not Applicable is shown when the denominator population is not on record, or when the rate cannot be calculated due to lack of disease incidence count or lack of denominator population.
  • The denominator population used to compute the overall U.S. rate varies from year to year and from disease to disease, due to changes in reporting status for specific diseases and locations. For example, the denominator population for Congenital Syphilis is the number of live births. See Reporting Issues for more information.
  • See About Rates in the Additional Information section below.

Step 2. Select location:
Click a button to choose locations for States and outlying areas or Regions. You can limit to your data request to items in only one of these categories. However, you can group the data report by another location type, to show a row for each area.
  1. State and outlying areas
  2. MMWR reporting regions
  3. HHS regions
  4. STD reporting regions
How?

Note:
Each state is a unique jurisdiction with different reporting rules for each disease. Reporting rules vary each year. See Reporting Issues for more information.


States and Outlying Areas

Select the location(s) that represent the patient's home state. Any number of locations can be specified here.

How?

Notes:

  1. The selection "United States, D.C. and outlying areas" includes Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.
  2. Each state is a unique jurisdiction with different reporting rules for each disease. Reporting rules vary each year. See Reporting Issues for more information.
  3. When the data are exported, separate columns show both the label and the code for each value. To see the full list of states and code values, request data grouped by State for the "United States, D.C. and outlying areas," and export the data results.

MMWR Regions

The states are grouped into reporting regions for the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Select the location(s) that represent the patient's home state. Any number of locations can be specified here.

How?

Notes:

  1. Each state is a unique jurisdiction with different reporting rules for each disease. Reporting rules vary each year. See Reporting Issues for more information.
  2. When the data are exported, separate columns show both the label and the code for each value. To see the full list of labels and code values, request data grouped by this region for the "United States, D.C. and outlying areas," and export the data results.
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Regions List of States
  1  New England Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont
  2  Middle Atlantic New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania
  3  East North Central Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin
  4  West North Central Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota
  5  South Atlantic Delaware, District of Columbia (DC), Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia
  6  East South Central Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee
  7  West South Central Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas
  8  Mountain Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming
  9  Pacific Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington
 10  Territories Guam, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands


HHS Regions

The states are grouped into reporting regions for the federal department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Select the location(s) that represent the patient's home state. Any number of locations can be specified here.

How?

Notes:

  1. Each state is a unique jurisdiction with different reporting rules for each disease. Reporting rules vary each year. See Reporting Issues for more information.
  2. When the data are exported, separate columns show both the label and the code for each value. To see the full list of labels and code values, request data grouped by this region for the "United States, D.C. and outlying areas," and export the data results.

Health and Human Services (HHS) Regions List of States
  1 Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont
  2 New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands
  3 Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia
  4 Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee
  5 Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin
  6 Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas
  7 Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska
  8 Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming
  9 (American Samoa), Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada
10 Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington


STD Regions

The states are grouped into reporting regions for the Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) surveillance program. Select the location(s) that represent the patient's home state. Any number of locations can be specified here.

How?

Notes:

  1. Each state is a unique jurisdiction with different reporting rules for each disease. Reporting rules vary each year. See Reporting Issues for more information.
  2. When the data are exported, separate columns show both the label and the code for each value. To see the full list of labels and code values, request data grouped by this region for the "United States, D.C. and outlying areas," and export the data results.

STD Regions List of States
  1.  West Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
  2.  Midwest Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin
  3.  Northeast Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont
  4.  South Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia (DC), Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia
  5.  Territories Guam, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands

Step 3. Select disease, gender, and years:
Limit your data request to the any number of options. The default option is all values.
  1. Disease and disease groups
  2. Year
  3. Gender (Female, Male, Unknown)
How?
See "How do I select items from the list box?" for help selecting items in a list box.

Note:
The reporting rules for the diseases vary. Each state is a unique jurisdiction with different reporting rules. Reporting rules also change over time. See Reporting Issues for more information.


Disease

Select one or more diseases to limit your data request.

How?
See "How do I select items from the list box?" for help selecting items in a list box.

Notes:

  1. Syphilis is classified in groups. The category Primary and Secondary Syphilis includes incidence of disease originally reported under the two individual disease categories primary syphilis and secondary syphilis. The category Primary, secondary and early latent syphilis includes incidence of disease originally reported under the three individual disease categories primary syphilis, secondary syphilis, and early latent syphilis.
  2. Each state is a unique jurisdiction with different reporting rules for each disease. Reporting rules vary each year. See Reporting Issues for more information.
  3. Select "all diseases" or any single disease category to get rates. Rates are not calculated when disease categories are combined, because the reporting populations differ by disease.
  4. The disease codes differ between the data releases, all the disease categories remain constant for the archive data 1984-2003, 1984-2006, 1984-2007.
  5. When the data are exported, separate columns show both the label and the code for each value. To see the full list of labels and code values, request data grouped by disease for "All Diseases" and export the data results.
Disease Code Description
273 Chancroid
274 Chlamydia
280 Gonorrhea
320 Total Syphilis
310     Primary and Secondary Syphilis
311             Primary Syphilis
312             Secondary Syphilis
313             Early Latent Syphilis
314     Late and Late Latent Syphilis
316     Congenital Syphilis


Year

Select any number of years to limit your data requests to the selected values. This field contains the year the case was reported.

How?
See "How do I select items from the list box?" for help selecting items in a list box.

Note:
The years of available case reports for the three archive data sources are: 1984 to 2003, 1984 to 2006, and 1984 to 2007.


Gender

Select one or more values from the list to limit your data request to the selected values. Gender is categorized as Female, Male or Unknown.

How?
See "How do I select items from the list box?" for help selecting items in a list box.

Notes:

  • Gender is shown as "unknown" for persons diagnosed with congenital syphilis, because the baby's gender is not collected as part of case surveillance data.
  • Rates are not available for the specific category for persons of unknown gender, because denominator populations are not available for this category.
  • The cases reports with unknown gender are not redistributed among male and female categories. Those areas reporting a high number of cases with unknown gender are likely to have under represented the number and rate of gender-specific cases.
  • When the data are exported, separate columns show both the label and the code for each value. To see the full list of labels and code values, request data grouped by Gender for "All Genders," and export the data results.

Step 4. Other Options:

Export Results:    If checked, then query results are exported to a local file. More information on how to import this file into other applications can be found here.
Show Totals:    If checked totals and sub-totals will appear in the results table. However, totals are not shown for STD Morbidity when data are grouped by Disease, because the populations shown are disease-specific. See Reporting Issues for more information.
Show Zero Values:    If checked rows containing zero counts will appear in the results table. If unchecked, zero count rows are suppressed.
Precision:    Select the precision for rate calculations. When the rate calculated for a small numerator (incidence count) is zero, you may increase the precision to reveal the rate by showing more numbers to the right of the decimal point.
Data Access Timeout:    This value specifies the maximum time to wait for the data access for a query to complete. If the data access takes too long to complete, a message will be displayed and you can increase the timeout or simplify your request. If you can't complete a request using the maximum timeout, contact user support and we will try to run a custom data request for you.
Calculate Rates Per    This value is the factor for the rate calculation. The default value is per 100,000 persons.

Data Source Information

Data Sources    Disease Incidence Sources:
The data are based on case reports of sexually transmitted diseases submitted by state and local health departments to CDC's Division of STD/HIV Prevention. The data are reported through STD*MIS, the National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance (NETSS) or the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS).

To learn more about the methods and source of these data please refer to:

Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2013:   Reports and corrections sent to CDC on hardcopy forms and for NETSS electronic data through June 4, 2014 have been included in the data for years 1984 - 2013. Congenital syphilis cases confirmed through January 2015 are also included, for births through 2013. See also Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2013.

Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2011:   Reports and corrections sent to CDC on hardcopy forms and for NETSS electronic data through June 7, 2012 have been included in the data for years 1984 - 2011. See also: Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2011.

Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2009:   Reports and corrections sent to CDC on hardcopy forms and for NETSS electronic data through June 9, 2010 have been included in the data for years 1984 - 2009. See also: Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2009.

Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2008:   Reports and corrections sent to CDC on hardcopy forms and for NETSS electronic data through June 10, 2009 have been included in the data for years 1984 - 2008. See also: Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008.

Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2007:   Reports and corrections sent to CDC on hardcopy forms and for NETSS electronic data through June 25, 2008 have been included in the data for years 1984 - 2007. See also: Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2007. and the errata.

Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2006:   Reports and corrections sent to CDC on hardcopy forms and for NETSS electronic data through June 22, 2007 have been included in the data for years 1984 - 2006. However, cases of Congenital Syphilis reported through June 25, 2008 are also included in the data for years 1984 - 2006. See also: Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2006.

Archive STD Morbidity data 1984-2003:   Reports and corrections sent to CDC on hardcopy forms and for NETSS electronic data through May 2, 2003 have been included in the Archive data for years 1984 - 2003. However, cases of Congenital Syphilis that were reported for 2002 after May 2, 2003 are also included in the data for 1984 - 2003. See also: Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2003.

Population Data Sources:

Due to use of the updated population data, rates may be different from prior or archive data sets.

  • United States state and national population:
    • Data for years 2000-2011: 
      The national population shown as the denominator for rate calculations is the sum of the state populations for each state reporting diseases in the given year. The population data used to calculate rates are the National Center for Health Statistics July 1st bridged-race postcensal population estimates for the resident population based on the Census 2000 counts. The population estimates were prepared under a collaborative arrangement with the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Center for Health Statistics. The population estimates are available on the Internet from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/bridged_race.htm. See population details below for more information. Note that the last available year of population estimates used to calculate rates for the United States may be a copy of the preceding year, if more current population estimates were not available at the time of publication.
    • Data for years 1990-1999: 
      The population counts for 1990-1999 incorporated the bridged single-race estimates of the April 1, 2000 resident population census. These files were prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute. The July 1st intercensal population estimates are available on the Internet from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/bridged_race.htm.
    • Data for years 1984-1989: 
      For the United States, rates were calculated using two sources:
      1. Bureau of the Census; United States Population Estimates by Age, Sex and Race:1980-1989 [Series P-25, No. 1045]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990] and
      2. United States Population Estimates by Age, Sex and Race: 1989 [Series P-25, No. 1057]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
  • Outlying areas: 
    Population estimates for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were obtained from the Bureau of Census web site: http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idb/tables.html. Note that the last available year of population estimates used to calculate rates for outlying areas may be a copy of preceding years, if more current population estimates were not available at the time of publication.
  • Population data for congenital syphilis rates: 
    Rates of congenital syphilis were calculated using published live birth information (coded by the States and provided to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Note the last available year of live birth data used to calculate congenital syphilis rates may be a copy of preceding years, if more current live birth data were not available at the time of publication.
Population details:

The archive release of STD Morbidity 1984-2013 includes these sources of population data:

  • The 2012 and 2013 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2010 - July 1, 2012, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2012). Released June 13, 2013.
  • The 2011 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2010 - July 1, 2011, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2011). Released July 18, 2012.
  • The 2010 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Bridged-race estimates of the resident population of the United States for April 1, 2010, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released November 17, 2011.
  • The 2009 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2009, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2009). Released July 23, 2010.
  • The 2008 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2008, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2008). Released September 2, 2009.
  • The 2007 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2007, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2007). Released September 5, 2008.
  • 2006 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2006, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2006). Released August 16, 2007.
  • 2005 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2005, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2005). Released August 16, 2006.
  • 2004 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2004, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2004). Released September 8, 2005.
  • 2003 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2003, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2003). Released September 14, 2004.
  • 2000, 2001, 2002 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2002, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003.
  • 1990-1999 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: intercensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 1990-July 1, 1999, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released April 15, 2003. Prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute.
  • 1984-1989 state population estimates based on the U.S. Census intercensal estimates for 1980-1989: Bureau of the Census; United States Population Estimates by Age, Sex and Race:1980-1989 [Series P-25, No. 1045]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
  • Population estimates for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were obtained from the US Bureau of Census.
  • Rates of congenital syphilis for 1984-1988 were calculated using published live birth data (NCHS; Vital Statistics Report, United States, 1988 [Vol.1-Natality]). Congenital syphilis rates for 1989-2011 were calculated using live birth data based on information coded by the States and provided to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. State rates for 2010-2013 were calculated using live birth data for 2010. Territory congenital syphilis rates for years 2010-2013 were calculated using live birth data for 2010.

The archive release of STD Morbidity 1984-2011 includes these sources of population data:

  • The 2010 and 2011 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Bridged-race estimates of the resident population of the United States for April 1, 2010, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released November 17, 2011.
  • The 2009 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2009, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2009). Released July 23, 2010.
  • The 2008 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2008, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2008). Released September 2, 2009.
  • The 2007 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2007, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2007). Released September 5, 2008.
  • 2006 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2006, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2006). Released August 16, 2007.
  • 2005 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2005, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2005). Released August 16, 2006.
  • 2004 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2004, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2004). Released September 8, 2005.
  • 2003 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2003, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2003). Released September 14, 2004.
  • 2000, 2001, 2002 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2002, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003.
  • 1990-1999 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: intercensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 1990-July 1, 1999, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released April 15, 2003. Prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute.
  • 1984-1989 state population estimates based on the U.S. Census intercensal estimates for 1980-1989: Bureau of the Census; United States Population Estimates by Age, Sex and Race:1980-1989 [Series P-25, No. 1045]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
  • Population estimates for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were obtained from the US Bureau of Census.
  • Rates of congenital syphilis for 1984-1988 were calculated using published live birth data (NCHS; Vital Statistics Report, United States, 1988 [Vol.1-Natality]). Congenital syphilis rates for 1989-2011 were calculated using live birth data based on information coded by the States and provided to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. State rates for 2009-2011 were calculated using live birth data for 2009. Territory congenital syphilis rates for years 2010-2011 were calculated using live birth data for 2010.

The archive release of STD Morbidity 1984-2009 includes these sources of population data:

  • The 2009 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2009, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2009). Released July 23, 2010.
  • The 2008 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2008, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2008). Released September 2, 2009.
  • The 2007 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2007, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2007). Released September 5, 2008.
  • 2006 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2006, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2006). Released August 16, 2007.
  • 2005 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2005, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2005). Released August 16, 2006.
  • 2004 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2004, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2004). Released September 8, 2005.
  • 2003 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2003, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2003). Released September 14, 2004.
  • 2000, 2001, 2002 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2002, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003.
  • 1990-1999 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: intercensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 1990-July 1, 1999, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released April 15, 2003. Prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute.
  • 1984-1989 state population estimates based on the U.S. Census intercensal estimates for 1980-1989: Bureau of the Census; United States Population Estimates by Age, Sex and Race:1980-1989 [Series P-25, No. 1045]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
  • Population estimates for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were obtained from the US Bureau of Census.
  • Rates of congenital syphilis for 1984-1988 were calculated using published live birth data (NCHS; Vital Statistics Report, United States, 1988 [Vol.1-Natality]). Congenital syphilis rates for 1989-2003 were calculated using live birth data based on information coded by the States and provided to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Territory congenital syphilis rates for years 2006-2009 were calculated using live birth data for 2006.

The archive release of Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2008 includes these sources of population data:

  • 2008 and 2007 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2007, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2007). Released September 5, 2008.
  • 2006 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2006, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2006). Released August 16, 2007.
  • 2005 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2005, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2005). Released August 16, 2006.
  • 2004 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2004, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2004). Released September 8, 2005.
  • 2003 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2003, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2003). Released September 14, 2004.
  • 2000, 2001, 2002 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2002, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003.
  • 1990-1999 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: intercensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 1990-July 1, 1999, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released April 15, 2003. Prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute.
  • 1984-1989 state population estimates based on the U.S. Census intercensal estimates for 1980-1989: Bureau of the Census; United States Population Estimates by Age, Sex and Race:1980-1989 [Series P-25, No. 1045]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
  • Population estimates for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were obtained from the US Bureau of Census. The 2006-2007 rates for outlying areas were calculated using the 2006 population estimates.
  • Rates of congenital syphilis for 1984-1988 were calculated using published live birth data (NCHS; Vital Statistics Report, United States, 1988 [Vol.1-Natality]). Congenital syphilis rates for 1989-2003 were calculated using live birth data based on information coded by the States and provided to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Rates for 2006-2008 were calculated using live birth data for 2006.

The archive release of Archive STD Morbidity 1984-2007 includes these sources of population data:

  • 2007 and 2006 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2006, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2006). Released August 16, 2007.
  • 2005 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2005, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2005). Released August 16, 2006.
  • 2004 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2004, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2004). Released September 8, 2005.
  • 2003 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2003, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2003). Released September 14, 2004.
  • 2000, 2001, 2002 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2002, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003.
  • 1990-1999 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: intercensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 1990-July 1, 1999, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released April 15, 2003. Prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute.
  • 1984-1989 state population estimates based on the U.S. Census intercensal estimates for 1980-1989: Bureau of the Census; United States Population Estimates by Age, Sex and Race:1980-1989 [Series P-25, No. 1045]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
  • Population estimates for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were obtained from the US Bureau of Census. The 2006-2007 rates for outlying areas were calculated using the 2006 population estimates.
  • Rates of congenital syphilis for 1984-1988 were calculated using published live birth data (NCHS; Vital Statistics Report, United States, 1988 [Vol.1-Natality]). Congenital syphilis rates for 1989-2003 were calculated using live birth data based on information coded by the States and provided to the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Rates for 2004-2007 were calculated using live birth data for 2004. Territory rates for 2005-2007 were calculated using live birth data for 2005, from the US Bureau of Census.

The Archive STD Morbidity data 1984-2006 includes these sources of population data:

  • 2006 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2006, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2006). Released August 16, 2007.
  • 2005 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2005, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2005). Released August 16, 2006.
  • 2004 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2004, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2004). Released September 8, 2005.
  • 2003 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2003, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2003). Released September 14, 2004.
  • 2000, 2001, 2002 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2002, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003.
  • 1990-1999 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: intercensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 1990-July 1, 1999, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released April 15, 2003. Prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute.
  • 1984-1989 state population estimates based on the U.S. Census intercensal estimates for 1980-1989:
  • Denominators for computing rates of congenital syphilis for years 1989-2005 were live births from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Vital Statistics: Natality, 1989-2005; and Vital Statistics Reports, United States 1999, Vol. 48 No. 10-Natality. Rates for years before 1989 were calculated using published live birth data (NCHS; Vital Statistics Report, United States, 1988 [Vol.1-Natality]). United States rates for the years 2005 and 2006 are based on the live births from the year 2004 National Center for Health Statistics Natality data. Rates for Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands for the years 1994 - 2005 are based on live births from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Natality Public Use Files. Territory rates for the year 2006 are based on live births from the 2005 National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Natality Public Use File.
  • Population estimates for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were obtained from the US Bureau of Census.

The Archive STD Morbidity data 1984-2003 includes these sources of population data:

  • 2000-2003 state population data from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the July 1 resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000-July 1, 2002 by year, county, single-year age groups, bridged-race, sex, and Hispanic origin (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003. The 2002-2003 rates are calculated using 2002 population denominators archive STD Morbidity data 1984-2003.
  • 1990-1999 state population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics: intercensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 1990-July 1, 1999, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex. Released April 15, 2003. Prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau with support from the National Cancer Institute.
  • 1984-1989 state population estimates based on the U.S. Census intercensal estimates for 1980-1989: (Irwin R; 1980-1989 Intercensal Population Estimates by Race, Sex, and Age; Alexandria: Demo-Detail, 1992; machine-readable data file).
  • Population estimates for 1980-1988 for areas outside the United States were obtained from the Bureau of the Census (Bureau of the Census; population estimates for Puerto Rico and the outlying areas: 1980 to 1988; Current Population Reports [Series P-25, No. 1049]; Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1989). After 1988, population estimates for outlying areas were obtained from various sources located in these areas. Population estimates for Guam were obtained from the Guam Bureau of Statistics and Plans; estimates for Puerto Rico were obtained from the Bureau of Census; and estimates for the Virgin Islands were obtained from the University of the Virgin Islands.

Notes on differences in sources of population figures in the archive (previous) releases:

  • In the Archive 1984-2009 data, the 2008 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2008, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2008). Released September 2, 2009.
  • In the Archive 1984-2008 data, the 2008 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2007, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2007). Released September 5, 2008.
  • In the Archive 1984-2007 data, the 2007 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2006, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2006). Released August 16, 2007.
  • In the Archive 1984-2003 data, the 2003 state population estimates are from the National Center for Health Statistics: Postcensal estimates of the resident population of the United States for July 1, 2000 - July 1, 2002, by year, county, age, bridged race, Hispanic origin, and sex (Vintage 2002). Released August 1, 2003.
  • Live births data for computing rates of congenital syphilis in any archive collection may vary, data are from the most recent year available at the time of publication.


Additional Information

Suggested Citation:    US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention (NCHSTP), Division of STD/HIV Prevention, Sexually Transmitted Disease Morbidity Archives, CDC WONDER On-line Database. [The specific citation for each database is shown below the query results.]
Contact:    Please call toll-free 1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) or e-mail the Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention at sdmb@cdc.gov.
Morbidity Rates:    About rate calculations: The default rate shown is the rate per 100,000 persons. The rate is calculated as the disease incidence count reported, divided by the population, and then the result is multiplied by 100,000 (or the specified factor in the data request criteria). The phrase Not Reported is shown when the specific disease was not reported for the given location and year. The phrase Not Applicable is shown when the denominator population is not on record, or when the rate cannot be calculated due to lack of disease incidence count or lack of denominator population. Rates are reported when data for all diseases or any single disease category are shown. Rates are not reported when data are combined for disease categories, because the reporting populations vary for different diseases.

About the national population: The denominator population shown for the nation (U.S. total population) is the sum of the annual population for those states reporting the disease. The U.S. denominator population used to compute the overall U.S. rate varies from year to year and from disease to disease, due to changes in reporting status for specific diseases and states. See Reporting Issues and Population Data Sources for more information.

About the inclusion of the number of live births: The denominator population for Congenital Syphilis is the total number of live births in the given year(s). See Population Data Sources for more information.

The denominator population for Total Syphilis does not include live births in the calculation.

About previously published reports for 1990-2002: The denominator population shown in the archive 1984-2003 database is the bridged-race intercensal population estimates for 1990-2002, as published by NCHS in 2003. Previously STD rates for 1990-2002 had been calculated with a different denominator population, thus the rates shown here may differ somewhat from previous publications.

In July 2006, the following population estimates were revised in the archive 1984-2003 online database:


Revised Population Estimates
Year Location Gender Previous Corrected
1984 Puerto Rico Female 1,712,900 1,699,900
1993 Virgin IslandsFemale 50,370 55,408
1993 Virgin IslandsMale 55,408 51,145
1997 Virgin IslandsFemale 57,032 51,570
1997 Virgin IslandsMale 52,645 61,293
1998 Virgin IslandsFemale 57,600 51,570
1998 Virgin IslandsMale 53,200 61,293

On July 20, 2009, the denominator population estimates for calculating congenital syphilis rates for years 1984-1993 in the territorial areas Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands were corrected in the archive 1984-2006 online database: the number of live births replaced the previous total population estimates.

Reporting Issues:    Case reports may differ slightly from previously published data due to later revisions.

Electronic versus hardcopy reporting:  Beginning in 2003, all 50 states and the District of Columbia had converted from summary hardcopy reporting to electronic case-specific reporting via NETSS (with the exception of congenital syphilis, which is still reported on hardcopy forms by several areas). Much of the data in this system are based on aggregations from hardcopy report forms. Form CDC 73.688 is the quarterly form used from 1963 to 2002 to report summary data for all stages of syphilis, congenital syphilis, gonorrhea, chancroid, and chlamydia. Data from the quarterly form CDC 73.688 are used for the "By Gender" data sets (current 1984-2008 and archives 1984-2003, 1984-2006, 1984-2007). Form CDC 73.2638 was used from 1981 to 2002 to report summary data for primary and secondary syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia by age, race, and sex. Data from the form CDC 73.2638 are used for the "by gender, age group, and race" data (1996-2008). Reporting entities differed in their ability to reconcile differences in total cases derived from summary hardcopy monthly, quarterly, and annual reports. Thus, there may be discrepancies in the total number of cases between competing data sources.

Unknown age, race and sex:  In the annual STD Surveillance Reports, unknown and missing values for age, race/ethnicity, and sex are redistributed based on the known distribution for these variables. In the WONDER online databases for STD morbidity, the value "Unknown" is retained for these three variables. As a result, the age, race or gender specific data presented in this application may not match the STD Surveillance Report and may not accurately reflect true incidence or rates.

About Chancroid reporting: Chancroid cases should be interpreted with caution in view of the fact that Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative organism of chancroid, is difficult to culture and, as a result, this condition may be substantially under diagnosed.

About Chlamydia reporting: Before 1996, Chlamydia reporting was voluntary, and thus sporadic. From 1995 - 2000, upstate New York did not report Chlamydia, and thus the total US denominator population for Chlamydia excludes the upstate New York population for the years 1995 - 2000. However, New York City did report Chlamydia before the year 2000, and the New York City population and Chlamydia cases are included for 1984 - 2000.

Since Chlamydia is often without symptoms, the number of cases reported is more a function of the amount of screening done and not the actual incidence. Screening occurs more often for women because Chlamydia is associated with Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and infertility. There is approximately a 4:1 ratio of women to men in Chlamydia case reporting due to screening practices. Refer to Tracking the Hidden Epidemics 2000 - Chlamydia for more information about reporting and gender differences. Traditionally male cases of Chlamydia have not been reported in the MMWR Notifiable Disease Annual Summaries.

States not reporting Chlamydia prior to 1995 are the following:

(1984) Guam, Virgin Islands, Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wyoming

(1985) Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Vermont

(1986) Alabama, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Michigan, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Jersey, New Mexico, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, Washington

(1987) Alaska, Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Michigan, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Mexico, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont

(1988) Alaska, Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Michigan, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Jersey, Virginia, Vermont

(1989) Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Michigan, Mississippi, New Jersey, Vermont

(1990) Alaska, Alabama, Colorado, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania

(1991) Alaska, Alabama, Florida, Michigan, Mississippi

(1992) Alaska, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi

(1993) Alaska, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi (1994) Alaska, Florida, Mississippi

(1995) Alaska
About Gonorrhea reporting:  In 1984, Gonorrhea was not reported by Guam or the Virgin Islands. Guam and the Virgin Islands are not included in the denominator population " for the total U.S. and territories, when Gonorrhea rates for 1984 are shown.

In 1994, Gonorrhea was not reported by Georgia. Georgia is not included in the total US denominator population, when Gonorrhea rates for 1994 are shown.

About Syphilis reporting:  Total Syphilis for a given year is the sum of reported cases for Primary Syphilis, Secondary Syphilis, latent (including neurosyphilis, Early Latent, Late and Late Latent, late with clinical manifestation other than neurosyphilis, and unknown latent) and Congenital Syphilis combined.

The disease category Late and Late Latent Syphilis includes cases of late latent syphilis, latent syphilis of unknown duration, neurosyphilis, and late syphilis with clinical manifestations other than neurosyphilis.

The denominator population for Congenital Syphilis is the total number of live births in the given year(s). See Population Data Sources for more information.

Congenital syphilis reporting may be delayed as a result of case investigation and validation. Cases for previous years are added to CDC's surveillance databases throughout the year. Congenital syphilis data reported after publication of the current annual STD surveillance report will appear in subsequent reports and are assigned by the case patient's year of birth.




This page last reviewed: Wednesday, November 01, 2017
This information is provided as technical reference material. Please contact us at cwus@cdc.gov to request a simple text version of this document.
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